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Wheelchair Accessible Tubs and Showers to Meet Your Preference

One of the most precious things that you can provide a loved one who has a physical handicap and who is confined to a wheelchair is the sense of normalcy. Let them feel that their disability is not a liability and they can live a normal life like most people. With the right tools and equipment, a physical disability should not be a hindrance. They should be empowered to do things on their own without the assistance of others. And most especially, they should still be able to take care of themselves, and this includes giving them the privacy to take a bath or use the toilet by themselves.
While it might be challenging to find things that will make life easier for individuals with disabilities and their families, it can be done. Bathrooms, in particular, can be enhanced with wheelchair accessible tubs and showers.
Wheelchair-Friendly Bathrooms

The first thing that you need to consider in your bathroom is the size. It should be bigger than the regular size of a bathroom for the convenience of the person using a wheelchair. To start, the entry way should fit the wheelchair easily. Next, once the entryway is just the right size, the space inside the bathroom should also be big enough for a wheelchair to access things easily. There should be enough space to move around and park the wheelchair itself.
The Toilet

There are two important parts of a bathroom: the toilet and the bath area. The toilet must be strategically placed near a wall so you can attach hand rails to the wall for the person to hold on to while transferring from his or her chair to the toilet. The rail should be strong enough to carry the person’s weight, especially if his or her body weight is heavier than normal.
The Bath: Accessible Tubs and Showers

Next, you have two choices when it comes to the bath area. In fact, you may even choose both. Consider having a walk-in tub. A walk-in tub is a specialized type of bathtub that has a door you can open to allow the person to get inside the tub without having to lift his or her legs. The tub may also come with a chair so the person can easily sit inside the tub. The door can be closed tight (as in water-tight) to allow the tub to fill. After bathing, the person may just drain the water with a push of the button and open the door to get into his or her wheelchair again.

For the shower, you can attach grip bars or hand rails, similar to the ones near the toilet, so the person has a sturdy bar to hold on to when standing up or getting into a shower chair. No lip showers are also advisable for easy wheelchair access. For the shower chair, it is advisable to attach it somewhere to ensure that this will not move or slip while the person is accessing it. Shower fixtures must also be installed at a level that is accessible to a seated person so the disabled will be able to easily to reach them. The same rule also applies to other parts of your bathroom, like lowered sinks and towel rails.

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